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saltwater guppies

Posted By ck2 3/15/2008 8:47:23 AM
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ck2
 Posted 3/15/2008 8:47:23 AM
 

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For over a week I been acclimated some fresh water fancy tail guppies to saltwater and well, it worked.

and here you go saltwater fancy tail guppies guppies

charlesr1958
 Posted 3/15/2008 9:02:41 PM
 

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Not sure why anyone would want guppies in a marine aquarium, but with their being a freshwater fish I suspect they will not last long term.  The inner "workings" of freshwater fish are vastly different than saltwater fish and by being in saltwater, it should only be a matter of time before the fishes livers fail and they die.

Saltwater Fish

Problems:
  • These fish are hypotonic to their surroundings. This means their blood has a higher water concentration than the surrounding sea water.
  • As sea water passes through the mouth and over the gill membranes, water molecules diffuse out of the blood into the sea water by osmosis.
  • These fish must replace the water which they constantly lose by osmosis
  • They can also only afford to produce a very small volume of urine.
  • Drinking sea water brings a large quantity of salt into the blood and this has to be removed.
Solutions:
  • To replace the water they lose, saltwater fish drink sea water.
  • To produce a small a volume of urine they must have a low rate of filtration of water into the kidney tubules.
  • This is done by having a kidney with relatively few small glomeruli.
  • Salt is removed by chloride secretory cells in the gills, which actively transport salts from the blood into the surrounding water.

Freshwater fish

Problems:
  • These fish are hypertonic to their surroundings. This means their blood has a lower water concentration than the surrounding fresh water.
  • As fresh water passes through the mouth and over the gill membranes, water molecules diffuse from the fresh water into the blood by osmosis.
  • These fish must produce a very large volume of urine to balance this large intake of water.
  • This large volume of urine carries salt with it, and the salt has to be replaced.
Solutions:
  • To produce a large volume of urine the fish must remove a large volume of water from the blood by having a high rate of filtration into the kidney tubules.
  • This is done by having a kidney with many large glomeruli - capillary networks from which fluid is filtered at the start of the kidney tubules.
  • Salt replacement is solved by chloride secretory cells in the gills, which actively transport salts from the surrounding water into the blood.


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argi
 Posted 3/16/2008 6:53:09 AM
 

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I recall a company many years ago that was selling saltwater fish that had been acclimated over to freshwater.  They had clowns and triggers along with some other.  That company did not last long as I have a feeling the problems Charles outlined came in to play weeks to months after the fish had been in full freshwater.

Let us know long term how it works out.  I know Mollies will live in both fresh and saltwater tanks (not sure what is different about their bodies compared to other freshwater fish) but I don't know long term how others would fair.

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Keith

"Simply put, you believe that things or people make you unhappy, but this is not accurate. You make yourself unhappy." Wayne Dyer

ck2
 Posted 3/16/2008 11:24:43 AM
 

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 Guppies can withstand levels of salinity up to 150% higher then normal sea water and are in the same family as the molly fish (Poecilia reticulata). Guppies are native to parts of South America but have been introduced to many different places. They've even found guppies living in the saltwater of the Everglades in Florida.

link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guppy#_note-6

There are many fish that can go from fresh water to salt, (look at the trout that goes from saltwater to fresh to lay their eggs).

These guppies will be put in a seahorse tank (where there can't be too many fast moving fish or aggressive fish). They also will feed on small brine shimp, algae, copepods and well just about anything I put in for the seahorses. Also, being that guppies breed fast, the seahorses can feed on the guppy babys to which they do eat.

Guppies are the first fish I've had and bred. I've always liked fancy tail guppies and the way they looked (and look even better in marine lights) and now I have the best of both worlds.

Why would anyone want guppies in a saltater tank?

Because nobody else has them in a saltwater tank.

argi
 Posted 3/16/2008 11:53:07 AM
 

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ck2 (3/16/2008)
There are many fish that can go from fresh water to salt, (look at the trout that goes from saltwater to fresh to lay their eggs).

But I don't think trout can stay in saltwater long term.  There are many fish that live in brackish areas where the water will be anywhere from totally saltwater to totally freshwater and everything in between.  Some fish can handle this type of environment while others can't.

I also recall hearing about an eel that does the same thing as trout.

ck2 (3/16/2008)
These guppies will be put in a seahorse tank (where there can't be too many fast moving fish or aggressive fish). They also will feed on small brine shimp, algae, copepods and well just about anything I put in for the seahorses. Also, being that guppies breed fast, the seahorses can feed on the guppy babys to which they do eat.

I kind of did the same thing with mollies years ago (I won't date myself too much by telling what year it was, LOL).  But mollies can be a little more aggressive than guppies so I didn't actually let the adults mix with the seahorses.

What type of sea horses are you getting (or do you have already)?  Many of the tank raised ones will eat frozen foods (like mysis shrimp) so live foods (like baby fish and brine shrimp) aren't as important as they were many, many years ago.

ck2 (3/16/2008)
Guppies are the first fish I've had and bred. I've always liked fancy tail guppies and the way they looked (and look even better in marine lights) and now I have the best of both worlds.

Also one of the first fish I bred.  I bet they do look good with actinic and full spectrum lighting.

ck2 (3/16/2008)
Why would anyone want guppies in a saltater tank?

Because nobody else has them in a saltwater tank.

Smile

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Keith

"Simply put, you believe that things or people make you unhappy, but this is not accurate. You make yourself unhappy." Wayne Dyer

ck2
 Posted 3/17/2008 7:51:15 PM
 

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I been into seahorses for about 3 years now.

I just have 3 Atlantic erectus but the guppies will go in a new 30g setup I have going now. I want to go for the $$/color seahorses now.

Yeah I know, the guppies are not really for food, I just wanted some open water fish and I seen people feeding guppies babies to seahorse so, Why not! and no one else has one.

They been in the big tank for a week now and doing good, eating and well..... having babys. I didn't know for sure but the female was pregnant when I got her. That was last night and today all are still there and all are eating.

It don't look like they even care about the saltwater

Steven Pro
 Posted 3/19/2008 4:09:01 AM
 

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I recall reading a post about a year or so ago on another board about someone acclimating fancy guppies to full strength seawater, just like people do with mollies.  I don't know if the original poster followed up though to report on long-term success or failure.


Steven Pro, yeah that is my real name.
ck2
 Posted 3/19/2008 1:48:55 PM
 

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I'll keep you posted.

I have 10 baby guppies also in the tank now, 8 in the tank and 2 in the sump. Last night I was able to net 1 guppy out of the sump and put him in the big tank. You can tell the size difference in the one in the sump and the ones in the big tank. so they are growing.

here's a pic of the babies

Also does anyone know anything about a blueberry gorgonians

argi
 Posted 3/19/2008 2:12:43 PM
 

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ck2 (3/19/2008)
Also does anyone know anything about a blueberry gorgonians

Not a whole bunch, but I believe they need to be feed (quite heavily) as they are not photosynthetic and their survival rate is not great.  Probabably not what you wanted to hear.

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Keith

"Simply put, you believe that things or people make you unhappy, but this is not accurate. You make yourself unhappy." Wayne Dyer

Steven Pro
 Posted 3/21/2008 3:04:34 AM
 

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ck2 (3/19/2008)
Also does anyone know anything about a blueberry gorgonians

Take a look at the February issue of www.ReefKeeping.com for an article on non-photosynthetic gorgonians and other filter feeders.


Steven Pro, yeah that is my real name.

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